W.D.Mo.: Under Motor Carrier Act (MCA), Weight of Vehicle Measured by Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) Which Includes the Weight of Trailer Pulled

McCall v. Disabled American Veterans Ernestine Schumann-Heink Missouri Chapter 2

This case was before the court on the parties dueling motions for summary judgment. Specifically, the motions addressed the applicability of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) to drivers employed by the defendants, in light of the Motor Carrier Act (“MCA”). As discussed here, the court was required to opine on the method by which the 10,001 pound threshold is calculated under the MCA, in order to determine whether a vehicle qualifies as a covered vehicle for the purposes of the MCA’s application to its driver(s). While the plaintiff argued that the actual weight of the truck, when loaded was less than 10,000 pounds, the court held that this was not dispositive of the issue. Instead, the court held that the plaintiff came within the MCA’s exemption to the FLSA because, “[t]he uncontroverted facts demonstrate[d] the truck’s gross vehicle weight rating (“GVWR”) exceeded 12,000 pounds.”

After surveying the MCA and the recent amendments thereto under SAFETA–LU and the TCA, the court- applying the post-TCA standard (due to the dates of plaintiff’s employment/claim) explained:

The TCA does not specify how the vehicle weight is to be determined: whether the vehicle is weighed loaded or unloaded, fueled or unfueled, or some sort of average is to be utilized. On November 4, 2010, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued Field Assistance Bulletin No.2010–2 (“the Bulletin”) to explain its interpretation of the TCA. Among other matters, the Bulletin announces DOL’s method for determining whether a vehicle weighs 10,000 pounds or less, stating the Wage and Hour Division “will continue to use the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) or gross combined vehicle weight rating in the event that the vehicle is pulling a trailer.”

The parties agree the Bulletin is entitled to deference because it represents DOL’s interpretation of statutory provisions it is charged with enforcing, but they disagree as to the Bulletin’s meaning. The Court believes the interpretation is quite clear: a vehicle’s GVWR is its weight for purposes of the TCA and, hence, applicability of the FLSA. If the vehicle is pulling a trailer, the combined GVWR of the vehicle and the trailer will be used. Plaintiff’s interpretation—that GVWR is to be used only if the vehicle is pulling a trailer makes no sense. There is no reason to use GVWR in one instance and not in another, and Plaintiff’s interpretation renders part of the Bulletin a nullity (or, at worst, surplusage) by purporting to have the Bulletin explain how vehicles are weighed if they pull a trailer but failing to explain how vehicles are weighed if they are not. The Court also notes DOL’s interpretation is reasonable because it not only leads to certainty but it is consistent with the Secretary of Transportation’s entire statutory and regulatory framework, which elsewhere typically relies on GVWR when referencing the weight of vehicles.

Plaintiff contends this interpretation thwarts Congress’ intent by diminishing the reach of the FLSA. The Court disagrees. Before 2005, the Secretary of Transportation had authority over all motor private carriers regardless of the weight of the vehicle, and the FLSA did not apply to any motor private carriers. With the passage of SAFETEA–LU in 2005, Congress removed the Secretary’s authority over motor private carriers using vehicles with a GVWR of 10,000 pounds or less—and thereby expanded the FLSA’s reach. The TCA restores the Secretary’s authority to all motor private carriers regardless of a vehicle’s weight, but specifies that the FLSA’s reach will remain as it was expanded with SAFETEA–LU’s passage. In short, the TCA expanded the Secretary’s authority, but it was not intended to further expand the FLSA’s reach—it remained exactly where it was before the TCA was passed.

Thus the court concluded:

There is no dispute that the GVWR of the vehicle Plaintiff drove exceeded 10,000 pounds. Therefore, the FLSA does not apply and the moving Defendants are entitled to judgment as a matter of law.

Click McCall v. Disabled American Veterans Ernestine Schumann-Heink Missouri Chapter 2 to read the entire Order and Opinion.

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Filed under Department of Labor, Exemptions

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