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Home » Exemptions » N.D.Ill.: Motor Carrier Act (MCA) Inapplicable Where Carrier/Employer Based Orders On Quarterly Forecasts And Items Did Not Have Specific Destination When Came In State

N.D.Ill.: Motor Carrier Act (MCA) Inapplicable Where Carrier/Employer Based Orders On Quarterly Forecasts And Items Did Not Have Specific Destination When Came In State

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Sedrick v. All Pro Logistics, LLC

Plaintiff sued his employers, alleging that they failed to pay him time and a half for overtime hours worked, as required by the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). Plaintiff had previously intended for this to be a representative action, but now sought to pursue relief only on his own behalf. The only question before the Court was whether Defendants are exempted from being required to pay overtime under the FLSA because of the Motor Carrier Act (“MCA”) exemption. Both parties moved for summary judgment on the issue of liability. The Court granted Plaintiff’s Motion denied Defendants’ Motion.

“APL provided transportation services to Bay Valley Foods (“BVF”). BVF produced a coffee creamer (“the product”) which APL transported for BVF. BVF produced the product at a facility in Pecatonica, Illinois. After being manufactured and placed into packaging, the product was assigned to particular customers, and a label was placed on the product to indicate the intended customer. The product was then transported to BVF’s warehouse facility in South Beloit, Illinois, one of several warehouse facilities BVF has throughout the country.

The product was allocated to customers pursuant to quarterly “forecasts” given to BVF by the customers, reflecting the customer’s likely future demand. However, because many BVF customers were large companies with multiple stores-some outside of Illinois and some within Illinois-the specific geographic destination of the product was unknown at the time it was packaged at the Pecatonica facility. The specific quantity a customer would actually receive was not known; a customer’s product allocation remained at the South Beloit facility until the customer contacted BVF and requested that part of its allocation be sent to a particular store, or stores, of the customer. Allocations of the product could remain at the South Beloit warehouse for as little as a day before being sent on to a customer, or as long as a year, after which time the product was recalled and would not be shipped to customers. Depending on the need of the customers, the product would sometimes be delivered within Illinois, and would sometimes be delivered outside of Illinois.”

In finding the MCA inapplicable to the case at bar, the Court explained,

“Applying section 782.7(b)(2) to this case, there was no fixed and persisting intent to move the product interstate at the time Sedrick transported it from Pecatonica to South Beloit. The product transported by Sedrick was assigned to particular customers, but that allocation were based on quarterly forecasts; it was not based on a specific order for a specific quantity to be moved to a specific destination beyond the South Beloit warehouse. § 782.7(b) (2)(i). The South Beloit facility served as a distribution point or local marketing facility from which specific amounts of the product were sold or allocated; the product was held in South Beloit until a customer contacted BVF and requested a specific quantity to be sent to a specific location, at which time BVF either permitted the customer to pick the product up itself, or arranged for the product to be shipped to the customer’s final destination. § 782.7(b)(2)(ii). Finally, transportation of the product from beyond the South Beloit warehouse was not arranged until after the product had arrived at South Beloit. The product remained in the warehouse from as little as one day to as long as a year before shipping arrangements were made. § 782.7(b)(2)(iii). Any product that remained over one year was recycled by BVF.

The Sixth Circuit in Baird v. Wagoner Transportation Co., 425 F.2d 407 (6th Cir.1970) reached the same conclusion based on similar facts. There, petroleum product was moved to a storage facility based on forecasts for particular customers, but was not delivered until a subsequent time when an actual order was made. Id. at 411-12. In that case, the record showed that the final location of the product was known, but the specific quantity to be delivered was unknown until after it arrived at the storage facility, as the original shipments were based on forecasts. Id. The court concluded from this that there was not a fixed and persistent intent to ship goods in interstate commerce. Id. In the case at bar, neither the quantity nor the destination is known. The quantity is unknown because, as in Wagoner Transportation Co., BVF’s production is based on forecasts, but the actual amount delivered may vary and at least some of the product will be recycled by BVF because it will remain at the South Beloit facility for over one year. Second, though the product is allocated by customer, it is not allocated to any customer’s specific destination, and many customers have several destinations where the product can be delivered.”

Thus, the Court concluded, “[b]ecause the product’s final destination was not known when Sedrick moved it from Pecatonica to South Beloit, this movement was not yet part of in an interstate journey, and the provisions of the MCA did not apply. Accordingly, the FLSA exemption for the MCA also did not apply, and Sedrick was entitled to the overtime provisions of the FLSA.”


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